The Writing Life kindle Í Paperback read ¶ annie dillard

book Ì The Writing Life Ì Annie Dillard

The Writing LifeLdhood; the Northwest pioneer epic The Living; and the nonfiction narrative Pilgrim at Tin Annie Dillard wrote a brutally honest description of her relationship and struggles with the process of writing Instead of the usual advice about showing not telling etc that I see etched inside my eyelids as I read The Writing Life I was compelled to copy its poetic uotes on note cards that I'll use as bookmarks I expect gems from this work will inspire and educate me as I stumble across them in days to come—uotes such as the content of a note from Michelangelo to his apprentice Draw Antonio draw Antonio draw and do not waste time And “Throw out the beginning; the book begins in what you thought was the middle It can take years and heartbreak to see that” Annie Dillard defines an important point as follows The writer must solve two problems Can it be done and Can I do it Every book has an intrinsic impossibility which its writer discovers as soon as his first excitement dwindles He writes it in spite of that He finds ways to minimize the difficulty; he strengthens other virtues; he cantilevers the whole narrative out into thin air and it holds And if it can be done then he can do it and only he For there is nothing in the material for this book that suggests to anyone but him alone its possibilities for meaning and feeling” In an effort to minimize the difficulty motivates me to sit in writing seminars and read how to writing books Other notes The tendency and pressure upon writers these days is to churn out several books per year Dillard writes the putting a book together is difficult and complex and should engage all the writer's intelligence Freedom as a writer is not “freedom of expression in the sense of wild blurting; you may not let rip” While I'd like to complete one book per year Dillard believes that writing a book full time takes between two and ten years I tend to rewrite over and over as I write Dillard advises the opposite “The reason not to perfect a work as it progresses is that original work fashions a form the true shape of which it discovers only as it proceeds so the early strokes are useless however fine their sheen And finally these words of warning The writer is careful of what he read for that is what he will write He is careful of what he learns because that is what he will know

Annie Dillard Ì The Writing Life ebook

Annie Dillard has written eleven books including the memoir of her parents An American Chi Beautiful essays on writing It’s not a how to guide but of a metaphorical deglamorization of what it means to be a writer The gist is that writing is agonizing work and those who are sane should probably avoid itIn her most dramatic moment Dillard compares being a writer to being a stunt pilot Stunt pilots write poetry in the sky with their loops and spins The audience is amazed by this beauty and imagines how wonderful it must feel In the cockpit however the pilot is experiencing bursting headaches and extreme pain from the various pull and tug of gravity To top it off he can’t even see the art he’s creatingWhile I suspect this book will scare off some would be writers as is its intent those of us familiar with the headaches and agony of creating sentences will probably find glorious inspiration in its pages Writing is not glamorous and it’s not too easy It takes a long time and is a lot of work I suspect most of us wonder if maybe we are crazy for doing it Dillard confirms that we are indeed crazy but there is great pleasure in hearing this from another insane person She is someone who both understands the struggle of writing and the inability to stop

book The Writing Life

The Writing Life kindle Í Paperback read ¶ annie dillard ã Annie Dillard has written eleven books including the memoir of her parents An American Childhood; the Northwest pioneer epic The Living; and the nonfiction narrative Pilgrim at Tinker Creek A gregarious recluse she is a member of the American Academy ofKer Creek A gregarious recluse she is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters Every paragraph is stunning and I especially like the previous owner's occasional marginalia in my hardback copyOn page 14 Dillard writes Flaubert wrote steadily with only the usual appalling strains For twenty five years he finished a big book every five to seven years My guess is that full time writers average a book every five years; seventy three usable pages a year or a usable fifth of a page a day The years that biographers and other nonfiction writers spend amassing and mastering materials are well matched by the years novelists and short story writers spend fabricating solid worlds that answer to immaterial truths On plenty of days the writer can write three or four pages and on plenty of other days he concludes he must throw them awayTo which the previous owner exclaims incredulous Absurd—writers write much and then a few lines down reasons Maybe without computer