The World We Have Lost Review ↠ 2

Summary Ò PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ´ Peter Laslett

The World We Have Lost is a seminal work in the study of family and class kinship and community in England after the Middle Ages and before the changes brought a. A long time ago in a sixth form far far away I read uite a bit of English social history; Cole and Postgate’s The Common People EP Thompson’s The Making of the English Working Class were typical examples This book is very much in that tradition written in the 1960s when historians’ interest in how people lived the details of their births marriages and deaths what they ate and how communities worked started to become mainstream It is a fairly forensic exmaniation of the condition of Engligh society in the seventeenth century before the Industrial Revolution got going I had never heard of it and came across it uite by chance in a charity bookstall in Longridge But a little bit of background research tells me that Laslett’s work is still considered to be essential preparatory reading for any student of early modern or modern social historyI found this an absolutely fascinating read; some of the content was fairly familiar to me for example the debunking of the notion that teenage marriage was the norm in early modern English society and a lot was brand new again as an example I hadn’t really appreciated the extent to which the nuclear family has been the bedrock of English society for the hundreds of years and that even then the old tended to live and die aloneBut the most interesting feature reading this book was the sense of reading a book about 17th century written in 1965 but with 40 to 50 years of hindsight on top The final chapter of the book “Understanding Ourselves in Time” is essentially an essay on the process of developing historical knowledge and insight and how we understand ourselves in contrast with our ancestors Laslett was writing 20 years after the creation of the Welfare State and with the perspective of the enormous benefits it had brought to British society Reading this in 2015 things seem so much complex but nonetheless I can heartily recommend this book to anyone interested in history and in fact to anyone who has never picked up a history book in their lives but is interested in how our society was made

Review The World We Have Lost

The World We Have LostBout by the Industrial Revolution The book explores the size and structure of families in pre industrial England the number and position of servants the elite mi. Really interesting and well written book Laslett's insights into pre industrial life in England are surprising but well documented I enjoyed his challenge to common sense generalizations about the past used either to laud or bemoan previous generation's in comparison to ourselves

Peter Laslett ´ 2 Review

The World We Have Lost Review ↠ 2 Ç The World We Have Lost is a seminal work in the study of family and class kinship and community in England after the Middle Ages and before the changes brought about by the Industrial Revolution The book explores the size and structure of families in pre industrial England the number and position of servants tNority of gentry rates of migration the ability to read and write the size and constituency of villages cities and classes conditions of work and social mobility. Pioneering work in the area of uantitative sociological history Laslett seeks to prove that poor preindustrial families were not constantly starving people who married young and had large families The parish registers and work of Gregory King go a long way to demonstrate this assumption This book is written in a very straight forward manner and often wanders into speculative history when the numbers are not enough to give voice to the lives of the preindustrial English Not to fear though Laslett is cautious about informing the reader when this is happening and despite what his critics say he does use the original voice of those whom he writes about when possible I gave a short talk on this book recently and was it was interesting to note that thought this book was written in 1965 people are often surprised to learn that families practiced birth limitation in the seventeenth century and married at mean ages of 24 and 28 for women and men respectively Laslett attributes this to our cultural association between Shakespeare and this time period He relates that our understanding of preindustrial England is similar to what might happen if future historians used Lolita as representative of our time