Free read º Why Priests? å PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free


Free download Why Priests?

Free read º Why Priests? å PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free é In his most provocative book yet Pulitzer Prize­–winner Garry Wills asks the radical uestion Why do we need priests Bestselling author of Papal Sin and Why I Am a Catholic Garry Wills spent five years as a young man at a Jesuit seminary and nearly becaN the Eucharist the sacrificial interpretation of the Mass and the ransom theory of redemption But Wills does not expect the priesthood to fade entirely away He just reminds us that Christianity did without it in the time of Peter and Paul with notable success Wills concludes with a powerful statement of his own beliefs in a book that will appeal to believers and nonbelievers alike and stand for years to come as a towering achievement. I saw Garry Wills interviewed by Stephen Colbert Feb12 sounded interesting so I ordered from the library

Why PriestsN the Eucharist the sacrificial interpretation of the Mass and the ransom theory of redemption But Wills does not expect the priesthood to fade entirely away He just reminds us that Christianity did without it in the time of Peter and Paul with notable success Wills concludes with a powerful statement of his own beliefs in a book that will appeal to believers and nonbelievers alike and stand for years to come as a towering achievement. I saw Garry Wills interviewed by Stephen Colbert Feb12 sounded interesting so I ordered from the library

Free read ´ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ò Garry Wills

Why Priests? ☆ In his most provocative book yet Pulitzer Prize­–winner Garry Wills asks the radical uestion Why do we need priests Bestselling author of Papal Sin and Why I Am a Catholic Garry Wills spent five years as a young man at a Jesuit seminary and nearly became a priest himself But after a lifetime of study and reflection he now poses some challenging uestions Why do we need priests at all Why did the priesthood arise in a religion that b. Priests the latest book from author and historian Garry Wills is one slippery fish The provocative title suggests a foundation shaking argument but the book is as much biblical history as contemporary critiue At first glance the title may sound anti Catholic but Wills is a Catholic and even dedicates the book to a priest And his argument has nothing to do with church scandals church politics or past or current leadership So slippery is this book that is has two different titles appearing in most places as Why Priests A Failed Tradition and in others as Why Priests The Real Meaning of the Eucharist I refer to it by the former as that seems to be most prevalent but I believe the latter provides a better description of the book “A Failed Tradition” suggests an accusation or a polemic but Wills answers the uestion “Why priests” not with slings and arrows but with scripture and scholarship It reads like a history of the priesthood And what a curious history indeed Wills sifts through a Gibraltar esue mountain of biblical research interpretation and second and tertiary sources He explores the familiar the AAA trinity of theologians Augustine Anselm and Auinas and the lesser known Melchizedek Most of his time is devoted not to priests directly but to the Eucharist and the New Testament’s Letter to Hebrews Overall this is a fascinating well written and researched book and I enjoyed the biblical scholarship and moments of philosophy However I’m not buying it as an argument against the priesthood Only in his opening and conclusion does Wills concentrate his energies directly on the issue of priests The rest is a somewhat tangential flow of information I recognize what Wills is doing He’s searching every back alley and byway for any topic related to the priesthood But it’s easy for the reader to lose the thread The subject matter was interesting enough to keep me reading but at the end of every chapter I wasn’t uite connecting the material with the thesis In the chapter “A New High Priest” Wills turns from historian to philosopher and this is when the book is most compelling First he examines the ritual of sacrifice and the logical pitfalls one stumbles upon when making parallels with crucifixion in Letter to Hebrews If what Jesus is doing is making out a beuest the receivers of the beuest are not the receivers of the sacrifice—which is offered to the Father who can get no benefits from the beuest 147 Most interesting is the chapter titled “Who Killed Jesus” Again scripture and theology are bound in logical paradoxes Even Anselm father of the ontological argument struggles with the order of the Trinity a biblical family tree with seemingly circular paternity Is the Father the prime mover The Trinity Perhaps my favorite paradox is the Eucharist If the body and blood of Christ is truly present in the bread and wine transubstantiation what happens when it comes out the other end Is Jesus still present post processing Apparently this was historically an important topic of theology and the answer as you might expect is a little odd In the closing section Wills lays out his final argument “If Peter and Paul had no need of priests to love and serve God neither do we” 256 I believe this is his elevator pitch He’s not arguing against Catholicism he’s not even calling for nor expecting the abolishment of the priesthood He’s simply making a case that spiritually priests aren’t a necessary conduit to God For that Wills makes a strong and compelling case Free read ´ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ò Garry Wills

Garry Wills ò 5 Free read

Garry Wills ò 5 Free read Egan without it and opposed it Would Christianity be stronger without the priesthood as it was at its outset Meticulously researched persuasively argued and certain to spark debate Why Priests asserts that the anonymous Letter to Hebrews a late addition to the New Testament canon helped inject the priesthood into a Christianity where it did not exist along with such concomitants as belief in an apostolic succession the real presence i. An amazing piece of erudition and a very provacative read about the assumed importance of clergy Far from a diatribe against the Catholic Church although I can understand how one emotional invested in organizated religion would see it as such Wills attempts a deconstruction of faith through a removal of those that deliver or manipulate it Through a subtle and profound reading of the few passages from the New Testament that promote an organized clergy while focusing on passages that extol teachings about community and personal salvation Wills presents a exposition of personal faith that many Catholics especially seem to avoid With the recent retirement of the pope the presentation of the institution of a clergy is timely indeedWhile not a Christian myself I felt a similar experience in reading this to my first reading of Kazantzakis' The Last Temptation of Christ