The Meaning of Night: A Confession characters ç PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free

Read The Meaning of Night: A Confession

The Meaning of Night: A Confession characters ç PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free × As a young boy Edward Glyver always believed he was destined for greatness A chance discovery convinces him that he was right greatness does await him along with immense wealth and influence Overwhelmed by his discovery he And treachery of death and delusion of ruthless obsession and ambition And at every turn driving Glyver irresistibly onward is his deadly rival the poet criminal Phoebus Rainsford Daunt The Meaning of Night is an enthralling novel that will captivate readers right up to its final thrilling revelatio. I was warned to persevere through the slow beginning and after a few chapters it really does become the gripping page turner promised in the back cover reviews In the first sentence the main character murders an unknown man He shortly reveals himself to be a grossly immoral opium eater bent on revenge — hardly an auspicious beginning even for an anti hero but at least an intriguing one Soon the intrigue becomes almost palpable and the hero becomes uite sympathetic as layer after layer of his story is revealed through various characters’ letters journals and recollections Intensely atmospheric very layered and surprisingly easy to follow — what’s not to like I did anticipate the major plot twists rather far in advance possibly because I’m naturally suspicious and read a lot of mysteries However my anticipation of them did nothing to diminish my enjoyment of the drama Michael Cox has masterfully captured the flavor of Victorian London and literature and created a mystery that really will keep you up at night Intriguing

Download ´ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ¾ Michael Cox

's path to reclaim his prize leads him from the depths of Victorian London with its foggy streets brothels and opium dens to Evenwood one of England's most beautiful and enchanting country houses and finally to a consuming love for the beautiful but enigmatic Emily Carteret His is a story of betrayal. This book is perhaps the worst book I've read in several years The plot twists were inane I kept thinking that the twists were so obvious that surely they were just decoys designed to obscure the real twists but no Those WERE the real twists twists that were super obvious and could only be surprising to someone who was either dumb or reading a totally different book And the whole thing went on and on for something like 690 pages And I hated the protagonist There was no point to anything he did OK so he was the real Lord Tansor after I figured that out on like page 3 I then had to sit for 687 pages while the idiot went on and on and on with a plan that was never going to work and that I as a reader was hoping wouldn't work The only character I liked was the one who couldn't talk Seriously

Michael Cox ¾ 5 Read

The Meaning of Night A ConfessionAs a young boy Edward Glyver always believed he was destined for greatness A chance discovery convinces him that he was right greatness does await him along with immense wealth and influence Overwhelmed by his discovery he will stop at nothing to win back a prize that he knows is rightfully hisGlyver. This book started out great The first line After killing the red haired man I took myself off to uinn's for an oyster supper really hooked me As the book continued it proved interesting a tale narrated in the first person by a man of obvious derangement convinced of his own rationality and the fact that he is justified in any action taken towards furthering his own ends Cox does an excellent job of capturing the feel of a Victorian novel and I think that may ultimately have been the problem As the story continued for page after page I simply got too bogged down in the sheer Victorian ness of it Tiny details of little or no interest and constant digressions from the main plot as the narrator sees conspiracies against him in every corner and hidden meaning in every turn of phrase Sheer number of pages or word count is not usually a huge impediment to me but there just wasn't enough of a pay off here for me to have any desire to continueMaybe someday I'll come back to this book and see if I'll find it any less of a slog but this one was just too much for me when I first tried to tackle it