epub ¿ Domestic Work Paperback Î randarenewables

mobi Domestic Work

epub ¿ Domestic Work Paperback Î randarenewables ✓ Winner of the 2001 Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters AwardIn this widely celebrated debut collection of poems Natasha Trethewey draws moving domestic portraits of families past and present caught in the act of earning a living and managing their households SmalWinner of the 2001 Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters AwardIn this widely celebrated debut collection of poems Natasha Trethewey draws moving domestic portr I absolutely loved this book the vignettes are superb You get so many vivid snapshots of life from the perspective of the women from the perspective of the observer and from outside perspectives She plays with form and makes a sonnet have life again Its like form springs to life in her hands

mobi ¸ Domestic Work ✓ Natasha Trethewey

In graceful and readable verse reveal the eually hard emotional work of memory and forgetting the extraordinary difficulty of trying to live with or without someo this woman uses language beautifully i just read and reread her work I see something new every time I do

Natasha Trethewey ✓ Domestic Work doc

Domestic WorkAits of families past and present caught in the act of earning a living and managing their households Small moments taken from a labor filled day and rendered here I first read Tretheway a year ago and I was not impressed Domestic Work’s “obsession with the stereotypes of blackness” as I responded back then “feels disingenuous and distanced” I faulted Tretheway’s narrative voice for inserting clichés into the minds of these black people in pictures; for example I felt that “ ‘At the Owl Club’ is meant to be a triumphant moment for the black man in America but instead it comes off as ‘the black man’ stereotype who eats gumbo and only ever thinks ‘I’m only a slave but at least I got paid’ as if all blacks in the 1930’s had not one original thought in their heads see ‘Naola Beauty Academy’ as well” This upset me especially as it came from a black woman because I was looking for something poetically deeper that could connect me with humanity and not just rehash the white washed stereotyped history of black America Upon reading this collection again though I still see these same issues I do not think they are as prevalent as I made them seem The third and fourth sections while still playing at the ekphrastic style are increasingly personal and Tretheway’s diction and imagery are diverse than I wanted to originally acceptI may have changed my opinions of her content but I still feel that this collection is unbalanced because the uncrafty telling narration of her ekphrasis contrasts disharmoniously with her great sense of visual imagery “Gesture of a Woman in Process” begins this trend “In the foreground” we are told what this picture depicts even as the last line gives us a poignant “still in motion” showing detail; it feels as if Tretheway didn’t know uite how to start the poem so she wrote down some telling facts and then evolved it into a showing poem; while perhaps interesting on the level of authorial poesis I really have no desire to see the process of writing in a finalized poem unless the poems means to do something of the sort “Mythmaker” plays with this issue by not so much a use of “telling” but a reliance on the second person and a forced inclusion of the reader; while the poem itself feels right “we” and “you” kick me out of the piece faster than the stereotypes In “History Lesson” the reader gets “I am four in this photograph” which is uite possibly the least interesting hook to a poem I’ve ever read and yet it’s part of a poem that ends with dramatic impact In all I feel that while Domestic Work has the mind of a poet it doesn’t uite have the style of one