READ à A Short History of Slavery

CHARACTERS A Short History of Slavery

READ à A Short History of Slavery ↠ As we approach the bicentenary of the abolition of the Atlantic trade Walvin has selected the historical texts that recreate the mindset that made such a savage institution possible morally acceptable even Setting these historical documents against Walvin's own incisive historical narrative the two layers of thLe morally acceptable even Setting these historical documents against Walvin's own incisive historical narrative the two layers of this extraordinary definitive account of the Atl. A well constructed and straightforward book which takes an overview of slavery mostly focusing on the Atlantic slave trade but also discussing slavery prior to the beginning of that trade and looking at some of the forms it has taken since that trade ended It also mentions but does not discuss or present any evidence about slavery in Islamic countries Each chapter gives a historical description of the period or theme and then presents a series of primary sources contemporary documents which give evidence for people's attitudes and actions These both add detail and make it much difficult to be in denial about the horrors of the situation

James Walvin ✓ 1 READ

Antic slave trade enable us to understand the rise and fall of one of the most shameful chapters in British history the repercussions of which the modern world is still living wit. A brilliant read tracing the start of slavery in ancient times and naturally concentrating on the slave trade in the 17th and 18th centuries Each chapter is in two sections; in formation and commentary followed by transcripts of original reports articles first hand recollections etc which provide a vivid account of the horrors inflicted What was surprising were the arguments against the abolition of slavery; it would damage the economy of Britain and in particular the cities Commerce came before humanity As this was first published in 2007 any updates could include on modern day slavery

CHARACTERS ☆ RANDARENEWABLES.CO.UK ✓ James Walvin

A Short History of SlaveryAs we approach the bicentenary of the abolition of the Atlantic trade Walvin has selected the historical texts that recreate the mindset that made such a savage institution possib. Exactly as the title promises this is a short history of slavery Criticizing it for not being comprehensive is unfair Walvin chooses to focus primarily on the Atlantic slave trade and even narrowly on the British enslavement of Africans and transport to the Americas He does include a few brief chapters on slavery in the classical world Medieval Europe and in Islam as preceded the Atlantic Slave Trade and ends with acknowledging that slavery did not end in 1807 when the importation from Africa was outlawed nor with the abolition of slavery in Brazil in 1888 the last of the Americas to officially abolish slavery but continues on today all around the worldWhat I love about this history is how he starts each chapter with his analysis and summary of the topic conditions on slave ships or how enslaved persons built community Then he dedicates the second half of each chapter to selections of primary sources His range of sources is impressive and very accessible for high school students As a high school teacher I appreciate the range of voices this allows me to show my students Also his style of making a claim backing it up with evidence from primary sources is a terrific model for our students to follow His overall style is very easy to read and he conveys a great deal of complicated information in a very readable accessible style So my short response is this is a great starting place If you want a terrific overview of how the British justified enslaving and torturing people what life was like on the ships and on the plantations understanding the complexity of conditions the depth and breadth of resistance and rebellion of enslaved persons and the eventual over two hundred years later rise of abolition sentiment again this is a very accessible overview I really appreciated the primary voices often painful to read but always insightfulMy criticism not really fair as I said since it is clearly a short history and by nature sharply focused but I can't help being frustrated that he leaves out all the other colonial powers again leaving us with the impression that slavery was mostly a BritishAfricaUS and ignoring the origins with SpanishPortuguese and completely ignoring the enslaving torturing and destruction of the indigenous populations of the Americas Walvin does discuss the West Indies and the sugar plantations but still focuses on the 1800s and cotton Also some of his language is I understand it was written before we recognized the need to switch to enslaved persons but at one points he talks about slaves and their owners being lovers um no