Do They Hear You When You Cry doc ☆ Paperback read

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Do They Hear You When You Cry doc ☆ Paperback read ✓ For Fauziya Kassindja an idyllic childhood in Togo West Africa sheltered from the tribal practices of polygamy and genital mutilation ended with her beloved father's sudden death  Forced into an arranged marriage at age seventeen Fauziya was told to prepare for kakia theThis is her story told in her own words of fleeing Africa just hours before the ritual kakia was to take place of seeking asylum in America only to be locked up in US  prisons and of meeting Layli Miller Bashir a law student who became Fauziya's friend and advocate during her horrifying sixteen months behind bars  Layli enlisted help from Karen Musalo an expert in refugee law and act Fauziya Kassindja grew up in Togo Africa in a privileged setting Her father did not believe in the tribal practices of polygamy and Female Genital Mutilation FMG Fauziya's father died suddenly and she was pulled out of school and put into an arranged marriage as a fourth wife and then told to prepare herself for FMGKassindja's sister went against her own husband to save her sister and help her to escape the country But escape to whatKassindja ended up going the the US and applying for asylum The customs officers immediately sent her to jail where she was kept for sixteen months Fauziya was treated worse than the worst offender as she had no status She was housed with murderers Her health deteriorated to near death without any concern of any officialKassindja was lucky in that her cousin went above and beyond to help her and she met Layli Bashir a law student and Karen Musalo a refugee lawyer who helped her and eventually got her asylumThis book really puts the immigration policy of the United States under intense scrutiny I believe that Canada's policy is much the same although evidently we were among the first to grant asylum for FMG applicants Kassindja was a brave and very strong person to withstand all the trials and tribulations and yes cruelty she encountered on her journey There has to be a better way to grant asylum to those who truly need it and send away those who don'tEvery single person should read this book as a means to better understand political imprisonment human rights and how immigration policies do not work

kindle ✓ Do They Hear You When You Cry Ú Fauziya Kassindja

For Fauziya Kassindja an idyllic childhood in Togo West Africa sheltered from the tribal practices of polygamy and genital mutilation ended with her beloved father's sudden death  Forced into an arranged marriage at age seventeen Fauziya was told to prepare for kakia the ritual also known as female genital mutilation  It is a ritual no woman can refuse  But Fauziya dared to try   This is one of those stories which if it were fiction it would be totally unbelievable It's the story of a young Togolese woman who flees Togo to escape an arranged marriage and genital mutilation only to get trapped in the immigration system upon arriving in the US As I was reading this book I would have given it four stars the writing could have been concise and there were some stylistic things that I didn't like But by the end I was so heartbroken and angry for Fauziya that to rate it any lower would have been wrong The writing is simple if you scan over some of the legalese and straightforward and utterly poignant

Fauziya Kassindja Ú Do They Hear You When You Cry kindle

Do They Hear You When You CryIng director of the American University International Human Rights Clinic  In addition to devoting her own considerable efforts to the case Musalo assembled a team to fight with her on Fauziya's behalf  Ultimately in a landmark decision in immigration history Fauziya Kassindja was granted asylum on June 13 1996  Do They Hear You When You Cry is her unforgettable chronicle of triump Here is Fauziya telling her life's story It's compelling I applaud her courage in several avenues First and especially in the continued need she consistently exhibits to demand that female mutilation becomes unacceptable and worthy of the condemnation that it so deserves Especially in Africa and the Middle East and within worldwide medical associations It's a cause of misery and terrible outcomes life long for a woman's health and natural barriers against infection Besides the brutality and trauma of the cutting operation itself its long term conseuences are even horrific But second and than that I applaud her ability to judge this escape as she did from deep within her own cultural dichotomy of conflicting influences Because she still doesn't acknowledge some of the negatives of her own culture and tribal beliefs that she does accept as normalSaying all that I thought the telling itself was jagged and endlessly rough Earlier childhood and the period up until her Father's death was ok but held many redundant phrases and repeating information After her Mother left it is so reactive and scattered with emotional upheavals and sometimes rants that in some aspects as bad as the facts surrounding her life and choices became Well she did the right thing but at times was also her own worst enemy Her own perceptions of others' cultures Fauziya holds her own tribal identity s and they do seem to give her a strong self identityAnd they served her eventual choices well