PDF ó BOOK Desert Notebooks


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PDF ó BOOK Desert Notebooks º For fans of Robert Macfarlane or Elizabeth Rush National Magazine Award winner and The Nation columnist Ben Ehrenreich layers climate science mythologies nature writing and personal experiences into a stunning reckoning of our current moment and our all too human urge to grapple with apocalypseA book about the literal and fFor fans of Robert Macfarlane or Elizabeth Rush National Magazine Award winner and The Nation columnist Ben Ehrenreich layers climate science mythologies nature writing and personal experiences into a stunning reckoning of our current moment and our all too human urge to grapple with apocalypseA book about the literal and figurative end of time and what that means for us as conscious beings Desert Notebooks looks at how both the unprecedented pace of destruction to our environment and our increasingly unstable global socio political in I have had an ongoing love affair with the deserts of the American Southwest for nearly two decades now and I take my reading related to it both seriously and critically With DESERT NOTEBOOKS Ben Ehrenreich delivers a new contribution to the canon of essential reading about the place and the rest of the world as it relates to itEhrenreich isn't writing a desert book per se but he is writing from the Mojave and his love for it is deep As climate change flexes its dark might around him and Donald Trump named here as The Rhino wreaks his havoc Ehrenreich delves into histories of the first inhabitants; the history of writing; philosophy and owls Sounds like a mash up and it is but it works Sometimes journalists turned authors produce work that simply reads like a collection of reported pieces sewn together with a half baked attempt at a narrative thread Ehrenreich avoids that trap; this man is a storyteller The mix of science myth anecdotes and a profound love for the terrain produces one of my favorite reads of the spring thus far if not the year

Desert NotebooksFor fans of Robert Macfarlane or Elizabeth Rush National Magazine Award winner and The Nation columnist Ben Ehrenreich layers climate science mythologies nature writing and personal experiences into a stunning reckoning of our current moment and our all too human urge to grapple with apocalypseA book about the literal and figurative end of time and what that means for us as conscious beings Desert Notebooks looks at how both the unprecedented pace of destruction to our environment and our increasingly unstable global socio political in I have had an ongoing love affair with the deserts of the American Southwest for nearly two decades now and I take my reading related to it both seriously and critically With DESERT NOTEBOOKS Ben Ehrenreich delivers a new contribution to the canon of essential reading about the place and the rest of the world as it relates to itEhrenreich isn't writing a desert book per se but he is writing from the Mojave and his love for it is deep As climate change flexes its dark might around him and Donald Trump named here as The Rhino wreaks his havoc Ehrenreich delves into histories of the first inhabitants; the history of writing; philosophy and owls Sounds like a mash up and it is but it works Sometimes journalists turned authors produce work that simply reads like a collection of reported pieces sewn together with a half baked attempt at a narrative thread Ehrenreich avoids that trap; this man is a storyteller The mix of science myth anecdotes and a profound love for the terrain produces one of my favorite reads of the spring thus far if not the year

EPUB â Desert Notebooks î Ben Ehrenreich

Desert Notebooks ê The American desert the main locales for the book are Joshua Tree and Las Vegas as a springboard to examine how we formulate our concepts of time and what it means to confront the looming apocalypse Desert Notebooks is a moving confrontation with Deep Time and a meditation on landscape in the face of climate change Faced with an uncertain future Ehrenreich argues there is comfort in reflecting on the role we humans have played in our own demise in the past The difference is that this time the clock may finally be running out for goo This book begins with a walk in a desert wash and an owl It ends much the same way But in between is a vast exploration of time of myth of change of place of faith of history of life The owl and deserts as well as the nature of time are themes throughoutI loved this book It does feel like a writer's notebook with sometimes very short two sentence sections of description or musing sometimes longer mini essays on a larger topic As such it constantly changes course taking the reader in new and always fascinating directions There is Lilith of the Bible the creation tale of the K'iche' Maya the Ghost Dance rock art; there is also present day politics the climate crisis Palestine and Las Vegas And so much It's impossible to summarize except to say it's a deep meditation on what it is to be alive in the America of today In that regard it is not especially optimistic We are not living in a pretty time But than that it is a meditation on lived experience how we interact with the worldI flagged many many passages Here are two as a sampling The first describes Ehrenreich's perception of time while living in war torn Ramallah in 2014 Time seemed to have changed its shape The clocks behaved as they always had ticking away counting off the hours They seemed to mock us Time no longer proceeded evenly and seuentially but according to a strange logic of dread It curved and bent revealing pockets inside itself pockets and holes in which it was easy to get lost Sometimes time rushed forward then something happened—usually death—and it stopped melted and recovered It lurched off racing once zigging and zagging before dissolving again and somehow from nothing reconstituting itself and limping on  I had felt this before in other countries on the verge of collapse I've felt it since not uite so acutely but nearly constantly in the year since the Rhino's Trump's election I don't know what to call it The time of Crisis Vertigo Time the Time of Collapse Black Hole Time The days and hours lose their shape their uniformity the confidence with which they once marched forth Time appears to fall apartI would say this is even true of life in the time of Covid 19 which hadn't hit yet when he wrote this book Though yes it was bad enough simply with Trump at the helm and things otherwise as usualAnd here's a bit on the Mesopotamian understanding of the universe pasted onto the present day The entirety of existence was a text waiting to be read Which means there could be no line between the reader and the written You who are reading this you too are written you too can be read And I a writer am already written through and through Everything between us everything that separates us mountains stars years shimmering thoughts and dreams that die with waking all of it is a single chain of signs that do not point to another reality only to this one all at onceI could uote but as I said it's difficult to pin this book down So I'll leave it at that Like Jenny Odell's How to Do Nothing I could definitely see reading this book all over again and finding it just as stimulating I looked at Goodreads to see what people thought and most people either loved it or hated it in the latter case because the author in the very first sentence calls Trump “the Rhino” appropriately if you ask me—those folks simply objected to the name calling never mind what was actually in the book—or else because the book isn’t really about the desert in all its glory That’s exactly what I liked about it though the book is about the desert and so much and it’s about our present moment which is awful in so many ways and yet time marches spirals wings us into an other time inevitably This won’t last forever With any grace from the gods it won’t last than two months But yes we’ve made it through awful times before and we’ll do it again Even as we keep on changing the planet And that too has happened before over and over Nothing new under the sun But that said this present moment is in itself something of a miracle Both at once Ain't it amazing? EPUB â Desert Notebooks î Ben Ehrenreich

Ben Ehrenreich î Desert Notebooks TEXT

Ben Ehrenreich î Desert Notebooks TEXT Stitutions have led to an existential crisis orders of magnitude greater than any humankind has confronted before As inhabitants of the Anthropocene what might some of our own histories tell us about how to grapple with apocalypse? And how might the geologies and ecologies of desert spaces inform how we see and act towards time?Employing an elegant discursive style that interweaves memoir with science writing creation myths and history National Magazine Award winner and The Nation columnist Ben Ehrenreich uses the desolate landscape of DNF Not at all what I hoped it would be Hoped it would be ruminations on the grandeur or history or people of the desert that might comfort and distract from 2020 news cycle and dreams of travel that can't happen But this isn't that It's of a litany of world political and environmental problems I already know too well and memoir of hopelessness Maybe it turns around partway through but I'm not in a place where I should be that patient to find out