Download Ebook ✓ uartered Safe Out There A Harrowing Tale of World War II ê 231 pages Ý George macdonald fraser

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Download Ebook ✓ uartered Safe Out There A Harrowing Tale of World War II ê 231 pages Ý George macdonald fraser ✓ George MacDonald Fraser beloved for his series of Flashman historical novels offers an action packed memoir of his experiences in50th anniversary of VJ Day in 1995 adds poignancy to a volume that eminent military historian John Keegan described as one of the great personal memoirs of the Second World War These days if I watch historical drama on TV I’m often left with the feeling that the programme makers have imposed modern social attitudes on the period featured Maybe it was ever thus and it’s a theme that features uite prominently in George MacDonald Fraser’s memoir written in the late 80s In his introduction the author comments that later generations“have a tendency to envisage themselves in the 1940s and imagine their own reactions and make the fatal mistake of thinking that the outlook was the same then They cannot see that they have been conditioned by the past forty years into a new philosophic condition they fail to realise there is a veil between them and the 1940s”The reader certainly gets a feeling of authenticity from this memoir Although the author considered himself a Scotsman he grew up in the town of Carlisle about 12 miles south of the Scottish border where his father had a doctor’s practice As a result he joined the Border Regiment which recruited from that part of England In both nationality and class he was something of an outsider although it seemed that it was the class differences that stood out On one occasion a newcomer to his section complained about stomach pains the night before an attack“He’ll have to go sick’ I said‘Aye’ said Forster ‘Sick wid nerves’ I said it might be appendicitisand Forster spat and said ‘Ah doot it’ Peel said nothing and we moved off to the Assembly point” The author continued by observing of his comrades in arms“They belonged to a culture in which “windy” is the ultimate insult and in which the synonym for brave is “mad” and that is all there is to be said about it”As the above exchange illustrates much of the book’s dialogue is rendered in North of England dialect easy enough for a British reader to follow maybe harder for others The descriptions of actual fighting are both vivid and visceral and the author is not one to express any feelings of regret or guilt On the contrary he exults in killing Japanese soldiers whom he regarded as murderers and as rapists of civilian women He retained these feelings for the rest of his life He concedes in the book that he found it difficult to reconcile the Japanese soldier of the forties with the young men he encountered at airports in subseuent decades but added that old habits died hard and he preferred not to sit next to them In general it’s probably fair to say that MacDonald Fraser’s social and political attitudes got stuck sometime around 1947 For all that this is an exceptionally powerful read especially for anyone interested in WWII The book ends with a wonderful epilogue where MacDonald Fraser attends a remembrance service on the 50th anniversary of VJ Day

Kindle ✓ uartered Safe Out There A Harrowing Tale of World War II Ý George MacDonald Fraser

Hen he arrived there in the war's final year and he offers a first hand glimpse at the camaraderie danger and satisfactions of service A substantial Epilogue occasioned by the uite simply the best personal history of World War Two I've read yes the only one but stillThe moving totally honest story of nine section in the closing days of the war through the final battles of the Burma campaign You'll laugh uite a bit you'll be moved a lot than you thought and you'll ask yourself What than a few times the dialogue is in the Cumbrian dialect or less AnglicisedHighly recommended to anyone interested in the British Army or looking for an unsanitized view of the end of the war at the sharp end Beautifully written hopefully you'll come back again and again

George MacDonald Fraser Ý uartered Safe Out There A Harrowing Tale of World War II Pdf

uartered Safe Out There A Harrowing Tale of World War IIGeorge MacDonald Fraser beloved for his series of Flashman historical novels offers an action packed memoir of his experiences in Burma during World War II Fraser was only 19 w This is hands down the best first person account of war in the China Burma India Theater in WW2 Written by the author of the Flashman historical novels it benefits greatly from Mr Fraser's talents as a fiction writer but it's all true Fraser described his service in General Slim's Army in Burma as the last echo of Kipling's world and that is not so far off the mark Having served in infantry units myself I felt the truth of this account in my bones The strange decisions the soldiers had to make like whether to shoot Japanese soldiers while sleeping or to wake them up first are the reality of the grunt's world they decided it didn't matter much one way or the other Fraser is brutally honest as when he describes being in the last battle of the war in which finally the invisible enemy became visible His battalion had spent months being shot at and losing men in the jungle by Japanese who melted away in the forest and finally they were fighting in the open; he tells of his happiness in being able to finally see and shoot the enemy And yet Fraser and his comrades were not blood thirsty; few soldiers are and those that are are usually poor soldiers They were there to do a job and get out alive and that's how most soldiers feel Not for the faint of heart but so truthful in its description of the combat infantryman's worldIf you have not encountered Mr Fraser in the Flashman series you should do so Flashman Royal Flash and etc etc Some very funny stuff there but his memoir of the war in Burma is another thing altogether; funny but tragic and true